Project allo – Entry 6

This is our fourth design idea. We designed and built it in tandem with Dynamic Defenders as an alternative interpretation of the original allo idea: all players control part of one object. In this game, players each man one of three cannons and try to protect their ship from incoming enemies. They can also collect power-ups that change the nature of the shots their cannons produce. For this prototype, players must try to survive for as long as possible before their health bar reaches 0.

Jellies in Space

The idea of this design was to encourage player cooperation by binding them to one in-game object and tasking them with protecting the object (and themselves by extension). Faculty and client response was positive, particularly with regard to its potential for expansion. They found the controller, a rough implementation of the Dynamic Defenders controller, unintuitive and they felt that having the spaceship rotate automatically was more of a hindrance than a help. Based on our client feedback we decided to move forward with this premise, and create a design for a full game around it.

Project allo – Entry 5

This is our third design idea. Since faculty responded positively to being able to freely bounce around, we decided to change the design to resurrect our initial goal of a cooperative experience while maintaining the player agency they liked. In this game, players must work together to protect a constantly-changing VIP player from hazards coming at them from offscreen. If a VIP is hit, they lose their status and the title shifts to another player. Players must try to survive for as long as possible; once all players have been hit as VIP, the game is over.

Dyanmic Defenders

This prototype was designed in response to positive feedback from our previous Bouncing Billiards prototype. We wanted to test a mechanic of giving players full agency in determining what they do, while incorporating game mechanics that require them to work together and help each other. Responses were positive, with the biggest issues being the learning difficulty and the incomplete quick-time interaction events. We ultimately discarded this idea in favor of our fourth prototype because we could not justify how the game could be expanded into a more comprehensive final product that required 14 people to make.